Friction

Jake rang the doorbell. Normally, he would just walk in because this used to be his girlfriend’s house. Well, it was still the same woman’s house, but she was no longer his girlfriend. He broke up with her five days before. She called several times, asking for him to come over.

Now he just rang the bell. She opened quickly and flashed her pale face for a second from behind the screen door. She asked him to come in while turning away, her voice low and shaky, jaded as usual.

Jake stepped inside. It was dark with the curtains drawn. Jesus fucking Christ, she lit some candles. The music in the background was disgusting. They used to make love to this music.

She whispered an awkward hello, only then did she turn to face him. She was dead white with the heavy makeup, her lips as red as blood. She had been crying. Was she trying to be pretty? Does she not know beauty comes from within?

Jake had broken up with her before, but she begged until he took her back. The following six months were the worst in his life.

“Is it gonna end now?” she asked, “After five years. It’s just gonna end like this?”

“Yeah, you know what you did,” he muttered, looking away. Her display of weakness disgusted him.

“What did I do that is so terrible? What? I am a woman, aren’t I?”

“A woman? A woman is kind and loving. You only think about yourself. Why should the both of us love only you?”

She started crying. Screaming. He turned and walked away.

The air was crisp and fresh, the sun was shining, it was almost springtime. The world was becoming more and more beautiful.

The Ocean and Mandy

I was dozing off in a rocking chair on the ocen-side proch of a small hotel in Maine. I still had about fifteen minutes before my shift in the kitchen, so I was trying to catch some z’s. The season was coming to an end.

A family came walking from the beach with all the towels and toys. Parents and two daughters, the little girl crying intensely.

“Come on, Mandy. Nothing bad happened,” the father was being reassuring and kind. A hippie dad with modern views on ubringing. Feminine type.

“We’ll get you new flip-flops,” said the mother, matter-of-factly.

The girl started wailing. I could only make out a few words.

“… giant wave… so big… my flip-flop…”

The family disappeared into the cozy interior and I was left alone with my thoughts. I opened my eyes, just a tiny slit, to see the ocean. It was calm, but overwhelming. I knew somewhere across was Europe and my misty motherland, but that did not matter. Might have been a different planet.